Sus Corazones

It may well seem funny to a reader that I am blogging about our HEARTS on the American holiday for tricks and treats.  Then again, our hearts, souls and emotions can serve as either or both challenging tricks or satisfying treats for wellness.

Why is it that elder spouses often pass quickly after their deceased partners? I don’t have firm statistical evidence for that “often” – yet you likely know cases in your spheres where this is so. Broken hearts can take one’s breath away – permanently.

According to Power of Positivity, “f your wife or husband dies, your mortality goes up and stays elevated for years. So you can almost ‘catch’ death from your spouse. It’s not a coincidence, it’s an effect…” Check this youtube video: https://youtu.be/lcC57sNERN8 

Five (5) adverse effects of broken heart syndromes are:

  1. sleeplessness
  2. weakened immunity
  3. depression
  4. physical pain and
  5. weight and body composition.

Even your humble scribe sees these five effects as being wellness takeaways. He also advocates physical activity to help avert premature death (heart disease in America’s biggest killer) and to help cope if someone you know, or you, suffers from a broken heart syndrome. By the way, this “stress cardiomyopathy” may also be triggered by the loss of a dear pet, or even a big sports win.

 

Be well.

 

 

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To supplement or not to supplement – that is the question…

If a published statistic is fairly accurate – only half of all adults in our fair land take supplements of one flavor or another.

Hmmm.  That factoid has this non-professional nutritionist pondering why.

Do those other halves believe that our soil is as fertile as in the past?

Do folks in the other halfsy believe that their normal diet provides adequate micro-nutrients and prebiotics plus probiotics?

I’m one to believe that our modern lives can benefit from prudent supplementation.  I’m not talking about steroids. CLA or  – just magnesium, biotin, a bit of sauerkraut and greek yogurt.

Remember that normal blood draws may not tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth.

What is your supplementation plan?

 

DF

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Waist to Hip measures!

Your humble scribe absolutely positively dislikes the venerable Body Mass Indicator (BMI) calculation to estimate obesity.  I curse that Belgian Adolphe Quetelet whom invented the index in the mid-1800s. Why? Athletes like me – with low body fat are regularly and erroneously classified as overweight or obese.

And simple waist measures may NOT be accurate guesstimates of obesity (which we acknowledge as a MAJOR health risk – yes?).

Enter the waist to hip measure – see https://www.thecalculator.co/health/Body-Type-Calculator-242.html (which anyone can perform privately – all you need to do is shed your clothes and uses a flexible tape measure.  Pick your body circumference just above your navel, then measure the widest spot around your hips.

Men – do your best to get your W-H ratio less than 1.0.

Ladies – strive for a W-H ratio less than 0.8 (even after childbirth).

WHR

Be more of a pear-shaped person than apple-shaped.

Yours in wellness,

df

 

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#FightFLU

Ah – it’s that achy time of year (again) for us Northern Hemisphere denizens.

(I’m not typing about Daylight Savings time which I think is a dumb and dumber idea, by the way).
FLU Season image healthyagingwebsite

Thanks to our Center for Disease Control (CDC) for this animated image

(YOU HAVE THE POWER TO FIGHT FLU): 

Sure – there is controversy as to whether our annual flu shots help most of us or not. As with most “insurance products” – one could play the odds.  I chose not to do that, being a slightly at-risk baby boomer with prior pneumonias in my medical history.

A simple yet effective step to avoid your FLU infection in 20118/2019 is to:

Wash your Paws (thoroughly)!

– A corollary addition for airline passengers, you should avoid touching your eyes, and keep your nose and eyes moist in-flight.

Back to the hashtag;  A Scripps Hospital posting offers, “experts are crafting vaccines to prevent influenza A H3N2 (the predominant strain last season), A H1N1 and two influenza B viruses that are reportedly on the rise.

Although the 2017–18 flu shot was only around 45 percent effective when averaging all strains, it’s still recommended for anyone who is older than 6 months and not allergic. It’s by far the best way to prevent the flu, or at least lessen the unpleasant symptoms that come with it, like fever, body aches and fatigue.”

Naturally, I’ll close with simple yet hard reminders to: get plenty of rest, exercise, hydrate, eat well and keep one’s stresses(cortisol) under control.   

 

Yours in Wellness,

DF

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T E A M

Your best personal exercise is one that you will stick with to make fitness and longevity impacts on your life.

Recently published studies of elders who exercise seem to suggest that Team sports make offer superior longevity perks.

Which one, of those analyzed activities, suggested the biggest boost to longevity?  Tennis.

Right- there may be unknown unknowns at play – perhaps affluence.

The lowest sport for longevity (though still favorable)?  Gym rat.

Social connection is strongly suggested as a factor in the tennis results.  It’s hard to play tennis solo 🤔.

As a rower who has often been told about crew’s longevity perks- I suggest that there are other team sports which keep us going besides tennis  🎾.

Yet there is a factor to remember as we boomers sweat and elevate our heart rates: just doing it (whatever it is) with someone you like is best.

Perhaps the LOVE score in tennis is there for a reason⁉️

Be well,

df

 

 

 

 

 

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National Bacon Day, then sunshine

Last week was pretty sad, as two larger than life figures moved on from earthly ways.  We miss ya, Scamp McCain and Queen of Soul.  Heaven’s streets have two special souls on them now.

To shake out of my downer mood of loss, I celebrated, on cue, International Bacon Day on September 1st.  Two puzzling observations – first, why is our Labor Day holiday close by this celebratory day? Hmmm.  And second, why is National Bacon Day on December 30th?  Is that a tariff-driven split for pork?

Well, as the omnivore that I am, I do enjoy non-nitrated(uncured)  and lean bacon. I buy into suggested correlations between red meat and testosterone levels for guys (I haven’t looked into any suggested correlations for the ladies). And I enjoy its taste.

I’m off a mindset that a little of a good thing is wonderful (thanks Mae West). On a different yet distantly relevant thread for “just enough” of something, good old Dr. Weil blogged about just enough sunshine, Vitamin D and possible longevity links,

“While I wouldn’t bank on sunbathing to add years to your life, it is true that most adults are not getting enough vitamin D, which we need for bone health and, more and more research suggests, for protection against a number of diseases, including many types of cancer. Our best source of vitamin D is sun exposure. The trick is to know how much is enough. That depends on where you live and your skin type.”

Should you opt to disregard Dr. Weil (or perish the thought – your scribe),  I’ll bet Baby Boomers will listen to the Beatles and their GOOD DAY SUNSHINE lyrics to enjoy their vitamin D and tender moments:

“Good day sunshine,
Good day sunshine,
Good day sunshine.
I need to laugh, and when the sun is out
I’ve got something I can laugh about,
I feel good, in a special way.
I’m in love and it’s a sunny day.”

 

Have something to laugh about, enjoy a ‘lil pork belly (uncured) and be Well Past Forty…

 

df

 

 

 

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“Stress + Rest = Growth. It’s as simple and as hard as that.”

Ah – simple yet hard.

This equation, per author  Brad Stulberg (@BStulberg), fits more than wellness in our lives.  For today – let’s stick with work and recovery in exercise.  And when we work out – it’s good for us boomers to complete at least 2/3rds of our training volume at low intensity (per RPE and heart rate).

In this OUTSIDE article, Brad states, “best endurance athletes in the world all have one thing in common: they oscillate between periods of stress and rest.”

 

Simple yet hard.

 

Be well,

 

DF

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